Olivers left to Twist.

Posted on março 18, 2009

0


- What was the question again, sir?

- What was the question again, sir?

THREE As NO LONGER ENOUGH FOR UNIVERSITY. New elitism row over entrance to top colleges.

THREE As NO LONGER ENOUGH FOR UNIVERSITY. New elitism row over entrance to top colleges.

Fears of a new educational elitism emerged yesterday after the University of Cambrigde changed its admissions policy in a way that critics said would favour independent schools. The university announced that 3 As at A-Level would no longer be enough for entry. From 2010 at least one grade should be at the new A* being introduced that academic year. Others, including Oxford, are expected to follow.

Geoff Luccas, secretary of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference, which represents independent schools, said: “We are delighted that Cambridge has shown leadership in coming out in support of the A*”.

(…)Only 29% of university students come from the poorest families, but at Oxford and Cambridge the percentage is even lower: 9.8% and 11.8% respectively.


A PORTRAIT OF 21st-CENTURY POVERTY

A PORTRAIT OF 21st-CENTURY POVERTY

Louise, 24, doesn’t smoke, drink or take drugs and she very rarely goes out with her friends. She spends pretty much all the money she gets in benefits on her children. She rejects the suggestion that her family might be described as poor. “Oh no,” she says firmly. “We get by”. (…) Daughter of a teenage mother who left the school without any qualification (…) she had hoped, briefly, to become an archaeologist until teachers stamped on the aspiration, pointing out she didn’t have a chance of getting into a university. 

(…) She ignores the faltering monologue from her son, who has been diagnosed with learning difficulties. (…) “There is a stigma  attached to this area [Hartcliffe, Bristol] . The teachers think that the children children from here are all thick and they don’t bother with them. I’m worried that my daughter won’t do as well as she could. She’s a clever litter girl but all that’s offered is a basic level of learning”.

(…) 3.9 million children in Britain classified as living in poverty. (…) In 1999 Britain had a higher proportion of children in poverty than any other western European nation. (…) Somehow, popular support for tackling child poverty in Britain has never been won, either by the government or by the legion of charities working in this area. While Live Aid and the campaign to end developing-world debt got hundreds of thousands out into the streets, there has never been much public enthusiasm for pouring money into relieving  poverty in our country.  (…) Many still refuse to concede that poverty even exists here. (…) “People find it easier to send money to buy a goat to help villagers in Africa than to help tackle poverty here”.

(…) Researches suggests that by the age of 22 months, a child living beneath the poverty line begins to fall behind peers from richer families, and by the time they turn six, previously less-able children from wealthier backgrounds will be ahead. Children living in poverty are only a third as likely to get five good GCSE’s as their richer classmates, and five times less likely to go to university.

As an alumnus of Cambridge University, I was pleasantly surprised to read the news that the admission policy was changing. (…) Inevitably there will follow vitriol about how the university is elitist, snobbish and only fit for toff, but I welcome the move (Pamela Welsh, mesmo jornal, mesmo dia)

 

É preciso dizer mais alguma coisa? Amanhã vou tentar fazer um aproximação nada apaixonada da cultura dos “DSS Seekers”, que tem relação com esse tema, mas por hoje, acho que um jornal respondeu o outro.

Anúncios